The Open Window

A brief insight through the looking glass and into my head. Do come in, but please wipe your feet first. I literally just mopped this floor.

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10:18 AM
July 24th, 2014
jonnovstheinternet:

[via]


9:08 AM
July 24th, 2014

jujyfruit0:

feathersofiron:

sadorapus:

candyredterezii:

people should just reply to anon hate with this

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damn dude thats brutal

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Make Mr. Rogers proud. Both of them.

(via justabookwhorewithateafetish)

9:04 AM
July 24th, 2014

zaccharine:

honestly my favorite thing ive ever made in photoshop is catloaf

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my graphic arts teacher hung it on the wall in the ga computer lab

(via walrusmstr)

8:55 AM
July 24th, 2014
8:53 AM
July 24th, 2014

enjolrs:

you get that look on your face when you look at him.

(via furiousdee)

8:53 AM
July 24th, 2014



8:52 AM
July 24th, 2014
12:19 AM
July 24th, 2014

ridge:

can we just talk about how the little brother of the actor who played Zero in Holes looks exactly like Zero now

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(via finnemoron)

12:18 AM
July 24th, 2014

peterandstiles:

deckthebunkers:

do you find it weird that you’ve known your parents for your entire life but they’ve only known you for a portion of theirs

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(Source: my-patronus-is-a-winchester, via finnemoron)

12:17 AM
July 24th, 2014

oscarstardis:

donatellavevo:

an emotional roller coaster from start to finish

This says so much with so little. The expert editing to the character of ‘Mum’ whose sudden interruption of our protagonist’s enjoyment is both comical and concise, offering a logical narrative development quickly. ‘Mum’ need not address herself as ‘Mum’, she need merely refer to “my car” and we can work out her relation to the protagonist from the previous information we’ve been given. New depths are added by the clear immaturity of our protagonist as she sings about being in her mother’s car before issuing a child-like “Broom Broom”, telling us that she is not ready to be driving her mother’s car, so perhaps we don’t want her to win in her objectives. This also  creates a plausible explanation as to why ‘Mum’ doesn’t want her daughter in her car, turning the mother figure from a one-dimensional antagonist to a fully-formed character in her own right. And finally the small, underplayed, “aww”, which, in its lack of surprise and tone of dull acceptance, forces us to speculate that this isn’t the first time our protagonist has experienced this twisting narrative. We are always held back from our dreams. We always repeat our mistakes. But life continues nevertheless. Broom broom. Broom broom, indeed. 

(via finnemoron)